Bartimaeus and others did not miss their time of visitation. What do you need from the Lord? Please don’t sit back. Cry out the more! Don’t miss the time of visitation.

TIME OF VISITATION

By Pastor Delbert Young

The Time of Visitation - sermon notes

Time of Visitation

Scriptures: Luke 18:31-33, 35-38; 19:1-4, 28-30, 35-44; Luke 19:44; John 5:25; Judges 10:3-4; 10:4; 12:13-14; 1 Kings 1:33; Zechariah 9:9; Luke 19:42

LUK 18:31-33, 35-38; 19:1-4, 28-30, 35-44)

Luke 19:44 And shall lay thee even with the ground, and thy children within thee; and they shall not leave in thee one stone upon another; because thou knewest not the time of thy visitation.

Jesus said Jerusalem and what turned out to be about one million more people including women and children would be destroyed because they knew not the time of their visitation. Their generation (Mat 23:36; 24:34) which Jesus viewed within the city, would perish and go into slavery. The Roman armies invaded the land in 66 A.D. The city and the temple were destroyed in 70 A.D. They missed the time (important word) of visitation. We are going to talk about The Time of Visitation.

This is the account of the Triumphal Entry. Jesus entered Jerusalem the Sunday prior to the Friday he was crucified. Today we are taught to call it Palm Sunday. It is the Sunday before Easter. We need to remember in the days of Christ their Sunday was considered more like our Monday. It was the day after the Jewish Sabbath (Saturday). It was normally the first word day of the week. However, this Sunday was not a normal Sunday. It was the Sunday before the Jewish Passover. Passover would be the next Saturday. The city was filling with Jews from every place. Let’s walk with Jesus the day before and that day to see what happened and attempt to understand the meaning of the ride into Jerusalem.

All things… shall be accomplished

The Time of Visitation. It would have been early morning some place just outside of Jericho. Jesus told his disciples that it was now time to go to Jerusalem. He said, Behold, we go up to Jerusalem, and all things that are written by the prophets concerning the Son of man shall be accomplished (Luk 18:31).

For the theologians among us, there is a false theology teaching Jesus was unsuccessful in his bid as the Messiah. The theology is called dispensationalism. The doctrine says the reason Jesus was not successful was because the Jews rejected him. It is because of that rejection the same theology teaches that we are now in a parenthetical time awaiting a great tribulation. However, according to Jesus, all things that are written by the prophets concerning the Son of man shall be accomplished. If the Lord failed, no one told him. Did he not say on the cross, It is finished (Joh 19:30)?

That morning the Lord told his disciples exactly what would happen to him. These events did not exhibit a failure. Rather, they showed the accomplishing of all things. Jesus would be delivered unto the Gentiles, mocked, spitefully entreated, spitted on, scourged, put to death, and rise again the third day. This was the way it was planned to be.

Peter

I don’t know if we remember it or not, but one day Jesus told his disciples what would happen to him at Jerusalem (Mat 16:21). Peter physically took Jesus and rebuked him saying, Be it far from thee, Lord: this shall not be unto thee (Mat 16:22). Because of this Peter, received one of the strongest rebukes in scriptures. Jesus said to Peter, Get thee behind me, Satan: thou art an offence unto me: for thou savourest not the things that be of God, but those that be of men (Mat 16:23). Any theology that claims that Jesus failed because he was rejected by the Jews and crucified is a doctrine of Satan. Jesus did not fail. He accomplished and finished!

Bartimaeus healed

As Jesus and the disciples began walking toward Jerusalem by way of Jericho, they passed a blind man named Bartimaeus. The blind man yelled out to Jesus saying, Jesus, thou son of David, have mercy on me (Luk 18:38). Some of the disciples rebuked Bartimaeus, but the Bible says Bartimaeus yelled out the more saying, Jesus, thou son of David, have mercy on me.

The Bible says when Bartimaeus continued yelling that Jesus stood. He commanded that Bartimaeus be brought to him. Jesus asked, What wilt thou that I shall do unto thee? And he said, Lord, that I may receive my sight (Luk 18:41). Jesus said something that we need not miss. He said, Receive thy sight: thy faith hath saved thee. What faith? All Bartimaeus had done was yell out, Jesus, thou son of David, have mercy on me. It was the faith that Jesus was indeed the son of David, the prophesied Messiah. If the son of David was there then the king was there. If the king was there then the kingdom was there.

We learn two things. Often even disciples of Christ do not reflect the heart of Christ. Jesus desires to heal. Secondly we learn that when Jesus is passing by, don’t sit back and wait thinking he will touch us because we are quiet. The woman with an issue of blood for twelve years and had spent all that she had on physicians (Mar 5:26) pressed through the crowd to touch his garment (Mat 9:21). The mother, a Syrophoenician woman, a woman from Canaan with the daughter possessed by the devil followed Jesus around like a dog asking the Lord to heal her daughter until he did (Mat 15:22). She too addressed the Lord as the son of David. When the mulberry trees are moved (2Sa 5:24), when the Spirit moves, don’t sit. Instead, yell out the more. Press in the more. What do you need from the Lord? Don’t miss your time of visitation.

All the people that saw it gave praise and the crowd followed Jesus into Jericho. Bartimaeus did not miss his time of visitation. What do you need from the Lord? Please don’t sit back. Instead cry out the more! Don’t miss the time of visitation. Recognize that Jesus is the king.

Zacchaeus

As Jesus passed through Jericho, the road that Jesus followed passed by a sycomore tree. Up in the tree was a man named Zacchaeus (Luk 19:1-4). The Bible tells us a few things about Zacchaeus. He was a chief publican (tax collector). Zacchaeus had other tax collectors under him. The Bible tells us that Zacchaeus was rich. And the Bible tells us that he wanted to see Jesus.

Seemingly Zacchaeus was doing well. He possessed everything he every wanted. He had the nicest land, donkeys, houses, things. Why would he even want to see Jesus and especially make a blatant spectacle of himself by climbing up a tree? In our natural vision, Zacchaeus had the world by the tail. In the eyes of the Spirit, in reality, Zacchaeus was miserable. He was greedy. He had stolen from people. There is no telling what else was going on in his life. Though he had possessed things, he was empty. Though he possessed things, he was heading for hell without Jesus. He wanted to see Jesus.

Jesus seeing Zacchaeus in the tree said, Zacchaeus, make haste, and come down; for today I must abide at thy house (Luk 19:5). Jesus was in a hurry and on a mission to get to Jerusalem. Nonetheless, Zacchaeus needed to see Jesus. Jesus will make time for people. Jesus spent the afternoon with Zacchaeus. The crowd murmured because Jesus went to the house of a sinner. Zacchaeus repented and said he would give half his goods to the poor and if he had taken anything dishonestly for anyone, he would repay it fourfold.

Jesus said to Zacchaeus, This day is salvation come to this house (Luk 19:9). Not only was Zacchaeus saved, but his household. Some of us need to climb a sycomore tree. We need husbands saved wives saved and children saved and grandchildren saved.

When people truly meet Jesus, something wonderful happens in their life. A love, a peace, a desire to love comes from them. Zacchaeus did not miss histime of visitation.

Many today are just as Zacchaeus was then. We have attempted to fill our lives with everything except what will truly fill it. Don’t miss the time of visitation. Don’t be too proud to put yourself in a position to see Jesus because it is in that position you put yourself to see Jesus that he will see you.

Lazarus

After spending some time with Zacchaeus, Jesus left Jericho and moved on toward Jerusalem. It was now afternoon. Though Luke did not record it, the next stop would be the house of Lazarus. Lazarus had been sick. The sisters of Lazarus, Mary and Martha, had sent for Jesus, but Jesus arrived after Lazarus had died. The Bible says that many of the Jews had come to comfort the sisters. As Jesus approached the house, Martha heard he was coming and went out to meet him. Martha told Jesus that had he been there, Lazarus would not have died. Jesus said that Lazarus would rise again. Martha said she knew he would be the resurrection of the last day. Jesus then said an astonishing thing. Jesus said, I am the resurrection, and the life: he that believeth in me, though he were dead, yet shall he live (Joh 11:35).

The resurrection is more than a future event. There will be a last day resurrection, but believers can live a resurrected life now. We are able to experience a supernatural abundant life now. The Lord’s doctrine of the resurrection is now and to coming (Joh 5:25).

JOH 5:25 Verily, verily, I say unto you, The hour is coming, and now is, when the dead shall hear the voice of the Son of God: and they that hear shall live.

Jesus proceeded to the tomb of Lazarus. He said, Take away the sone. Then he said, Lazarus, come forth (Joh 11:43) and of course Lazarus did. Lazarus, Mary, and Martha did not miss their visitation because they believed. What is it that we need for a loved one?

Colt of a donkey

As he came near the cities of Bethphage and Bethany, he sent two of his disciples to bring back a colt donkey (Luk 19:29-30). Close to the Mount of Olives, the disciples placed their cloaks upon the donkey cold and Jesus rode into Jerusalem on the donkey.

Why did Jesus do this? Why did he ride the donkey into Jerusalem? What does that mean?

Riding on the back of an animal is a mark of wealth, rank, and authority. Jair, a judge of Israel, had thirty sons that rode on thirty donkey colts (Jdg 10:4). Another judge named Abdon had forty sons and thirty nephews that rode donkey colts (Jdg 12:14).

JDG 10:3 And after him arose Jair, a Gileadite, and judged Israel twenty and two years.

JDG 10:4 And he had thirty sons that rode on thirty ass colts, and they had thirty cities, which are called Havothjair unto this day, which are in the land of Gilead.

JDG 12:13 And after him Abdon the son of Hillel, a Pirathonite, judged Israel.

JDG 12:14 And he had forty sons and thirty nephews, that rode on threescore and ten ass colts: and he judged Israel eight years.

As the person rode into town on the donkey, it was an expression of his rank and authority and dignity over that city! As Jesus rode into Jerusalem, he made a statement that the true authority of that city was there. It is not a sign of Jesus coming as the “lowly king” on a donkey.

I heard someone say that the triumphant king would ride upon a great horse. That is simply not scriptural. David and Solomon rode upon mules.

1KI 1:33 The king also said unto them, Take with you the servants of your lord, and cause Solomon my son to ride upon mine own mule, and bring him down to Gihon:

The statement the Lord was making is that he was king and authority of Jerusalem. He was the king and authority of Zion, the seat of David. This was the proper way the awaited king would enter his city. It was the fulfillment of the prophecy. The context of what all were saying proves exactly this.

ZEC 9:9 Rejoice greatly, O daughter of Zion; shout, O daughter of Jerusalem: behold, thy King cometh unto thee: he is just, and having salvation; lowly [gentle], and riding upon an ass, and upon a colt the foal of an ass.

Zechariah’s context is not about a weak king. He is a mighty king, yet gentle and just. Remember that Jesus had told his disciples that he would accomplish all things written by the prophets (Luk 18:31). Jesus rode into Jerusalem as the king having salvation. This is obviously understood by the disciples. As Jesus came close to the city they began shouting saying, Blessed be the King that cometh in the name of the Lord: peace in heaven, and glory in the highest (Luk 19:38). The Time of Visitation.

The daughter of Zion and the daughter of Jerusalem were to rejoice greatly because the King cometh. Within the gates of Jerusalem is mount Zion. This is the place that David established his tabernacle. When Zion is referred to, it is a reference to the coming of the Messiah through the lineage of David to sit upon the throne of David. Jesus is proclaiming that exact event as he enters upon the donkey. This is a reference to Jesus sitting upon the throne of David as King.

What does this mean to you and me? This means that the Jesus we serve is both king and Lord. It means there is a full and total salvation for each of us now. It means that we can all come before the throne of grace today and find help in a time of need (Heb 4:16).

Rebuke thy disciples

The Time of Visitation. As the disciples rejoiced saying, Blessed be the King that cometh in the name of the Lord and a crowd began to gather, the Pharisees came to Jesus saying, Rebuke thy disciples (Luk 19:39). Jesus said to the Pharisees, I tell you that, if these should hold their peace, the stones would immediately cry out (Luk 19:40). It was a Time of Visitation.

. . . he beheld the city, and wept over it

This was the time that all creation was awaiting. What a marvelous day it was! The long awaited King was entering the city. The crowd gathered. The people were clamoring and shouting. They began to lay branches and articles of clothing in the path of the donkey (Mat 21:8). It seemed that all was well. The city was receiving her king. There was tremendous rejoicing and gladness. Yet, in the midst of the crowd and clamor, Jesus stopped and beheld the city and wept over it (Luk 19:41). Why?

The rejoicing was short lived. In five days the shouts of Hosanna would turn into Crucify him. Jesus looked upon the city that would kill him and said the city would be surrounded with enemies. The city would be laid even with the ground. Even the children within would be killed. Concerning the temple, not one stone would stand upon another (Luk 19:44; Mat 24:2). Jesus said it would come upon that generation (Mat 23:36; 24:34). In A.D. 70 the Roman army sieged Jerusalem, built a wall around it, destroyed the city and the temple, and killed over one million people children included. It was the abomination of desolation and the great tribulation of Matthew 24:15, 21.

Because of this, Jesus wept over the city. As he looked at the city and spoke what would happen, he ended with these words, … because thou knewest not the time of thy visitation (Luk 19:44).

LUK 19:42 Saying, If thou hadst known, even thou, at least in this thy day, the things which belong unto thy peace! but now they are hid from thine eyes.

The Lord rode on into the city in the midst of the cries and shouts as him accomplished all things. He rode up to the temple and entered. He drove out all those that bought and sold. There are no quickies when it comes to worshiping and sacrificing to the Lord. All that week he loved the people. He taught them and healed them. He battled with the religious system condemning it and spoke the woe unto it. Thursday night, Jesus began the New Testament. Judases betrayed Jesus and Jesus was arrested. Friday he was beaten, scourged, crucified, mocked and died.

The Time of Visitation. He did not die in failure, but in total accomplishment having said, It is finished. Everything the prophets spoke concerning Jesus is fulfilled. He is King and Lord. He died, shedding his blood, to provide a way for each of us to enter his kingdom.

Other Related Sermons:

Do All Religions Lead to God? – sermon video audio notes

What Do You Want Me To Do For You? video audio notes Luke 18:31-43

Whosoever Shall Have Whatsoever – sermon video audio notes

Also see:

Sermons Change The World

Life Gate Church sermons by Delbert Young